TGIF: Doubling as an artist and street cop on Aviles

Travel, St. Augustine, Aviles Street, Florida, travel, vacation, Georgia Nick Gallery, art, painting

Aviles Street in St. Augustine, Florida.

After seven intensive days painting as a Plein Air artist in St. Augustine’s Glided: Impressions of the Flager era, I was ready to put my watercolors and pastels away and cool my brushes.

As I was leaving the Gilded Art Walk reception, a fellow Plein Air artist mentioned a one day event on Aviles. It seems the Art Gallery owners on Aviles Street were inviting artists to paint one day then exhibit the art afterwards.

Since my car was still loaded with art supplies, I decided to participate the next day.

Outside Georgia Nick Gallery

An artist paints in front of Georgia Nick Gallery.

I arrived early the following day for the event. I stopped by Georgia Nick Gallery to receive a badge and gift bag. I found a place on a busy corner to paint.

Corner where I painted

Intersection where I doubled as an artist and traffic cop.

I found a vantage point on a busy corner. Doubling as artist and traffic cop, I painted and hailed traffic for cars driving nearby. It seems the drivers were blind sided and needed help crossing the intersection.

My painting, "Afternoon on Aviles."

My painting, “Afternoon on Aviles.”

After a few hours of painting and hailing traffic, I was pleasantly surprised at results of the painting. I didn’t see much potential in the watercolor wash initially. But as I begin to use complementary pastel colors I could feel the painting coming to life.

http://www.elainemarieartist.com

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TGIF: No means yes in South Beach

A picture of the museum

The Jewish Museum Florida FIU was designed by Henry Hohauser who attended Pratt Institute.

South Beach is a place of defiance. I once heard someone say, people come to South Beach to do every “God forsaken” thing they wouldn’t do anywhere else! No means yes in South Beach.

It should come as no surprise that the Jewish community in South Beach has often defied the status quo.

Art Deco weekend.

Thousands of people come to Art Deco Weekend each year.

Barbara Capitman, a Jews, defied the establishment. Capitman fought city officials “tooth and nail” to preserve the historical buildings that light up Miami Beach and make it the second most popular place in Florida. If not for her vision and perseverance, there would not be an Art Deco District. The over 800 Art Deco buildings that remain are testaments to Capitman’s defiance. The Art Deco District was the first 20th century neighborhood placed on the National Register of Historic Places much to her efforts. The Miami Design Preservation League continues Capitman’s legacy.

Poster

Miami Design Preservation League poster rallying the community.

What’s more, Henry Hohauser, an architect who was Jewish, built over 300 Art Deco buildings. Hohauser lived in an era when signs “Gentiles Only” and “No Jews Allowed” were commonplace in South Beach. Jews were not even allowed to live beyond 5th Street.

An Art Deco chandelier and displays inside the Jews

An Art Deco chandler and displays inside the Jewish Museum.

Visit one of Hohauser’s buildings and experience first hand the story of Jewish culture in Florida. Hohauser’s building, once a synagogue, is now the home of the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU. Eighty stained glass windows, a copper dome, and chandeliers are reminders of the days when Hohauser and others worshipped in the synagogue. Taste and see the Jewish experience during the Jewish Food Tour that leaves from the Museum. Learn how the Jewish community thrived despite many obstacles.

Falafel and Israeli salad.

Enjoy Falafel and Israeli salad on the Jewish Food Tour.

Facing off with those who thought South Beach should be known only as a place for “fun in the sun,” Holocaust survivors garnered public support for the building of the Holocaust Memorial. A memorial garden and a sobering sculpture recall those who died and remind all who visit: “we shall NEVER forget.”

Sculpture at the Holocaust memorial

A bronze sculpture by Ellsworth Kelly at the Holocaust Memorial.

The impact of Jewish culture permeates every aspect of the city. Mount Sinai Hospital was built because Jewish doctors weren’t given staff privileges at area hospitals. The Bass Museum scheduled to reopen in the fall, is named in honor of John and Johanna Bass, Jewish immigrants who bequeathed over 500 works of art to the City of Miami Beach.

The Bass Museum in Miami Beach.

The Bass Museum in Miami Beach during Art Basel.

It is said that obstacles are opportunities. Fighting bias and opposition, the Jewish community realized that no means yes in South Beach.

http://splashandcolor.com

https://jmof.fiu.edu

http://holocaustmemorialmiamibeach.org

TGIF: A Perfect Setting for “The Crown”

Queen of peace

“Queen of Peace” the perfect name for a craft at the serene Island of Tory.

Tory Island’s cliffs, mountains and shoreline are like an instant replay of the award-winning drama, The Crown. In the beach episode in Scotland, the Queen Mother escapes to a quiet shoreline to gather her wits. She got some peace of mind and a bargain on a castle. You’ll find bargains and a royal retreat at Tory Island.

Tory Island, Ireland has the distinction of having a resident, King. Besides greeting visitors, I’m not sure what his official duties are. The King of Tory rules over a small and quaint island kingdom. Tory Island has a hostel and hotel, grocery store, some shops and a post office. We spent two enjoyable days on Tory Island during John Eagle’s lighthouse tour.

A sign for the ferry.

A sign for the ferry to Tory Island.

We caught the ferry to Tory Island and checked into the Tory Hotel. The lightkeeper welcomed us. After freshening up, we headed to the Tory Lighthouse. We walked around the lighthouse grounds and posed for group pictures.

Tory island lighthouse.

Tory Island Lighthouse.

Later while the group had dinner, I scouted the nearby sights. I wanted to see and draw a few buildings before sunset. I gave a sketch of a house to one of the locals I met. The people of Tory, like the rest of Ireland, are very friendly.

A sign in Irish dialect.

The past and the present converge at Tory Island.

They are also proud of their Irish heritage and speak an Irish dialect. Tory is home to a colony of prominent artists. The King of Tory is also an artist.

Street sunset

Sunset on the streets of Tory Island.

After sketching, I went with the group on a sunset tour of Tory Island. We saw a spectacular view of the mountains, cliffs and the ocean. It was a wonderful way to close the day.

Sunset view of a cliff.

The sun falls softly on a cliff at Tory Island.

From my hotel room, I had a glimpse of the Tory Lighthouse. Before turning in for the night, I paused for a while and watched the flashing Lighthouse beam against the dark sky.

In the morning, I arose early for a final walk through Tory Island. I was glad I did. I got a close up view of a historic Tower.

Tory Island offers cultural sights and breathtaking views in a peaceful setting. It is ideal for a retreat or a quiet getaway. You’ll get the royal treatment at Tory Island.

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/elaine-austin.html?tab=artwork

http://www.elainemarieartist.com

TGIF: First Day Hike Cape Florida Lighthouse

Cape Florida Lighthouse.

Copyrighted Cape Florida Lighthouse by Elaine Marie.

Start the New Year off on the right foot. Experience a day of hiking adventure on January 1. Journey through one of Florida’s most breathtaking ecosystems. Learn about the Top 10 butterflies at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park beginning at 9 am. End the hike with a visit to the Lighthouse.

For more information, call 305–361-5811.

http://www.elainemarieartist.com

TGIF: Tropical Fun At Art Basel Miami Beach

Art by Kehinde Wikey.

Art by Kehinde Wiley draws crowds and big bucks at Art Basel Miami Beach.

With a backdrop of tropical Palm trees, quaint Art Deco buildings and azure sparking ocean,  North America’s largest Art Fair comes to Miami Beach.

Art by Pablo Picasso

Master Works by Picasso, Monet and others are featured in the Salon.

Dive into Art Basel Miami Beach through December 4. Enjoy contemporary art by the masters and up and coming artists at the main venue in the Miami Beach Convention. More than 200 galleries from around the globe display art. The Convention Center is where you can get free information and free transportation to most of the Art Fairs during Art Basel Miami Beach.

Miami Art Basel.

Out door installations by artists like George Baselitz are featured at Bass Museum’s Public Art.

See over 20 outdoor Public Art installations at the Bass Museum and Collins Park in Miami Beach by leading and emerging international artists. Public Art creates an awareness of art and promotes art talk in friendly places.

Stop by the fun pop up galleries. Hotels and vacant buildings are converted into galleries. Along the shoreline, there are tents exhibiting art. People hop from gallery to gallery.

The fun doesn’t end in Miami Beach. There are lots to see at the Rubell Family Collection, de la Cruz Collection, and other galleries in Wynwood, as well as the Design District and more.

Visit Art Fairs located throughout the city during Art Basel Miami Beach with a breeze. Save yourself some cash, stress and a parking ticket, catch one of the free shuttles. Parking is always a premium in Miami. During Art Basel the competition and prices for parking will be at an all time high.
Ride Miami Art Express: a complimentary service that provides transportation to the Miami Beach Convention Center, Midtown, Wynwood and the Design District.

Check out the City of Miami Beach’s free shuttles to the various fairs around the beach, downtown Miami and Middle Beach.

Read my past posts on WordPress for Survival Tips Art Basel Miami Beach and more.

For more information visit, City of Miami Beach’s website  http://www.miamibeachfl.gov/Transportation/scroll.aspx?id=81810 or Miami Dade Transit’s website at http://www.miamidade.gov/transit/art-express.as

http://www.elainemarieartist.com

“A Terrible Beauty” Exhibit at the Hunt Museum

The History Lesson

“The History Lesson” and other thought provoking paintings on display.

Limerick was a perfect place to begin my lighthouse tour of Ireland. I learned about the history of the Irish people at the Hunt Museum’s exhibit “A Terrible Beauty.” It gave me valuable insight into the culture and the history behind the formation of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Silver coin Judas received to betray Jesus.

A silver coin thought to be the coin Judas received to betray Jesus.

The Hunt has a collection of 2,000 original works of art. I was fascinated by a coin said to be one of the silver coins Judas was given to betray Christ. There were modest works by Renoir and Picasso I admired.

I enjoyed the special exhibit “Terrible Beauty” by Robert Ballagh. It is a centennial reflection on the Irish uprising. Ballagh revisits paintings like Delacroix’s “Liberty Leading  the People”, Goya’s “Third of May” and other reinterpretations to bring to light the universal struggle for social justice. They provide a powerful backdrop to Ballagh’s other paintings that are a personal narrative about the courageous leaders of the uprising. I was especially intrigued by “The History Lesson.”

View of the Shannon River from the Hunt Museum.

View of the Shannon River from the Hunt Museum.

After touring with a docent, I stopped by the Museum cafe for tea and a light bite. I walked along a walkway outside the Museum to catch a glimpse of the Shannon River and King John’s Castle to complete my visit.

http://www.huntmuseum.com

wwww lashandcolor.com

http://www.elainemarieartist.com

 

Preservation 50 Friday: The Legend of the Mooncussers

Cape Florida was attacked by Seminoles.

Cape Florida was attacked during the Second Seminole War.

While I knew that lighthouses have often come under attack during various wars in the United States. I had never heard of the Mooncussers. Legend has it that some attacked light keepers and put out the light.

They would also lure vessels onto the dark coastline. Armed with a “Judas Lantern,” these shoreline pirates would situate themselves along the coast, directly behind dangerous rocks.

They would gyrate a lantern to resemble a swaying ships lantern. Seeing the light and thinking another ship had found safe harbor, the deceived captain would stir in that direction and become aground. In rocky seas, the ship would break up and its cargo would be stolen by Mooncussers. Some claim that if the sea was calm, Mooncussers would beat or kill the sailors.

America’s Atlantic Coast Lighthouses by Jeremy D’entremont

http://www.elainemarieartist.com