Lions Adulting 

The Lions at San Marco Square donned birthday hats for the 21st Birthday Celebration. The landmark fountain was installed 21 years ago. The Venetian inspired square hailed visitors and locals to an afternoon of live music, vendors and free photos by the fountain. Restaurants and shops got in on the party by offering discounts on a picture perfect day. 


San Marco in Jacksonville, Florida is home to some of the area’s best restaurants as well as art galleries, Art Deco buildings, historic mansions, fashionable boutiques and more.  

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San Marco Celebration 

See captivating art at Trends.


Enjoy family friendly events at the 21st Anniversary of the installation of the Lions Fountain. The San Marco Preservation Society and the San Marco Merchants Association hosts this birthday celebration on Saturday from 4-8 pm. Experience art at Trends Home and Art Boutique. Trends is open 11-4 pm. 

Art Guild of Orange Park “Our Town” exhibit.

 

San Marco is a popular destination in Jacksonville, Florida. It is home to art galleries, Art Deco buildings, outstanding restaurants, historic mansions, fashionable boutiques and more.  

Trends is located at 3915 Hendricks Avenue in San Marco.

Experience Captivating Art at Trends

After being featured in the United States Lighthouse Society’s newsletter, I unveil two Plein Air paintings at Trends Art and Home Boutique. The two paintings showcase my captivating and colorful style. My work is part of the Art Guild of Orange Park’s “Our Town” juried exhibit. The opening reception is October 7 from 3-5 pm with the exhibit continuing through November 3. Trends is open Tuesday-Saturday. 


Trends Art and Home Boutique is located in San Marco at 3915 Hendricks Avenue. San Marco is a popular destination in Jacksonville, Florida. It is home to art galleries, Art Deco buildings, outstanding restaurants, historic mansions, fashionable boutiques and more.  
For more information, call 904-346-1738. 

Elaine Marie Artist

Lighthouses Built to be in Harm’s Way 

Hurricanes do terrible damage to lighthouses. I know that lives are of far more value than lighthouses. Still I can’t help but wonder how Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and the other lighthouses on the East Coat will be impacted by Hurricane Florence. It goes without saying that lighthouses are high risk real estate. The sole purpose of a lighthouse is to save lives in dangerous places. 
I thought about this while finishing this article on New Canal Lighthouse in New Orleans. It was severely damaged by Hurricane Katrina.
I visited the New Canal Lighthouse during an overnight stay in New Orleans. I realize the typical tourist in New Orleans doesn’t visit a lighthouse but I was surprised when the Concierge had no knowledge of any Lighthouses in the area. In fact there were two-New Canal and Port Pontchartrain. 
Undaunted I used GPS to find the lighthouse. I arrived a few hours before the lighthouse opened. 
The New Canal Lighthouse resembles a house. The rebuilt lighthouse sits atop pilings to prevent storm surges like the one caused by Hurricane Katrina. The lighthouse was restored by the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation in 2012. 

Beacons of the High Seas

According to the Navy League, no industry has been more vital to the economy of the United States than that of America’s maritime industry. Lighthouses was once the cornerstone of maritime industry. 


For the month of August, I will be celebrating National Lighthouse Day with discounts on my lighthouse art at the boutique store Made in Jax at the Jacksonville International Airport. 


Save big on my Gliclee prints at the airport. Gliclee (zhee-KLAY) is a museum quality investment that uses acid free watercolor paper, and pigment based archival inks. This insures that Gliclees never fade, degrade or yellow. Unlike a print that may fade, a 6 color ink jet process ensures a Gliclee retains its original luster. 

Breaking the Sound Barrier

I visited the Pensacola Lighthouse with my family after attending a reunion in Mississippi. This would be the fourth and final lighthouse to sketch during our trip. I was happy to end the trip with a lighthouse I had longed to paint. Located on the western most tip of Florida, the lighthouse seemed to be unreachable. 

Although rain had been forecasted for the day, we decided to visit the lighthouse on a cloudy day. After clearing security, we headed to the lighthouse. The National Naval Aviation Museum was in eyesight of the museum. Although I’ve been to many air shows, the sight and sounds of the Blue Angels flying near the lighthouse captured my imagination. 

To see more of my art and to learn more about lighthouses,  visit my website Elaine Marie Artist

Charting a new course in London


I traveled to Trinity Buoy Wharf to sketch London’s only lighthouse, Bow Creek or Trinity Lighthouse, a day before my visit to see the paintings of JMW Turner in the Tate Museum in London. I admire the art of Turner and was excited about my upcoming visit to the Tate Museum. There was much to see-Turner bequeathed over 300 paintings to museum.

But first I was headed to the lighthouse. As we got off the Tube, we followed the directional signs to Trinity Buoy Wharf. Once there, we happened upon a lightship, in addition to the lighthouse. Two light vessels at one stop! Amazed, I hurriedly sketched the lighthouse. As the wind flipped the pages, I quickly sketched the lightship while my daughter took shelter in a nearby restaurant.


As I sketched the lightship, I thought about Turner and pondered how I could pay tribute to him. Pausing for moment, I became spellbound by the lightship that was now converted into a studio. It seemed pregnant with stories of its past.


Back in the United States, I looked at my yellow foreground and became inspired when I read how much Turner used yellow. According to the book How to Paint like Turner, “Some of Turner’s most daring and experimental innovations centered around his use of yellow. It seems to have been his favorite color and he used it liberally…For more than thirty years his use of yellow became one of the most frequently mentioned aspects of his art, with critics variously accusing him of ‘yellow fever’…”