TGIF: Keys Residents say they need help not tourists

Although no longer in the headlines, the Florida Keys is still suffering from the impact of Hurricane Irma that hit in September. In a desperate move, the Keys were open to the public on October 1. Tourism is the lifeline of the economy. 

While Key Largo and Key West suffered little damage, most of the Keys were devastated by Hurricane Irma. 

According to FEMA 25% of the homes in the Keys were impacted by Hurricane Irma and 65% of the homes were destroyed. Recovery efforts continue in the the lower Keys and Marathon which were hardest hit by the storm. 

The focus on luring tourists back to the Keys has baffled some residents who still haven’t recovered from the hurricane. They feel essential needs of residents are being overlooked. 

Schools and educational organizations in the Keys have also been devastated and need help. Big Pine Academy is asking for donations for their recovery efforts. Donations will help rebuild the school and replace supplies lost by the teachers. Visit their website to see how you can help. (https://bigpineacademy.com)

I’m determined to do what I can to help. I am donating 40% per cent of the proceeds from my coloring book Splash and Color to the Early Learning Children’s Foundation in Miami.

The Early Learning Children’s Foundation carried supplies to the Keys immediately after the hurricane. They have a track record of helping the residents of the Florida Keys. It’s my boots on the ground approach. Please buy a coloring book to help South Florida recover from Hurricane Irma. 

https://www.splashandcolor.com

Advertisements

The Bass: Talk of the Town

 

image

Before renovation, The Bass displays Public Art during Art Basel. 

The Bass solidifies its position as an art leader in Miami by bringing a fresh way of seeing and experiencing art. The grand reopening of The Bass heralds a new age.

After being closed for 2 1/2 years, The Bass opens with much fanfare and anticipation on Sunday. Before its temporary closure, the museum had transformed itself to a hotspot for contemporary art.

Now it artfully and skillfully showcases its old masterpieces alongside contemporary art. Botticelli, Rubens, El Greco and Van Dyke take center near contemporary art and challenges visitors to rethink their perceptions about art.

Instead of discarding the past, The Bass preserves it in a fresh and exciting way. The Art Deco building that houses the Bass is revitalized with new exhibition spaces, expanded lobby and education center, and grand staircase.

Designed by Russell Pancoast in the 1930s, it is one of the oldest buildings in Miami Beach. With the new expansion, the old and new form a fascinating dialogue.

As William Murtugh states “…at its best, preservation engages the past in a conversation with the present with a mutual concern for the future.”

The Bass has done that in a bold and brash way.

Hey Mr Trump Art is Business

Art Basel bring tens of thousands of cultural travelers to Miami each year.

As a savy businessman and leader of the free world, I would think you would appreciate that Art is Big Bucks.  I read that in February you visited the National Museum of African American Museum (NMAAHC). I am sure you didn’t have to stand in line like most Americans to visit the museum. I had to get up early three months in a row to get timed tickets online. It took me more than one hour to go through an online que to finally get the tickets.

The point I’m making is that the African American Museum is driving people to Washington, DC. Probably people like me who only decided to revisit DC because of the Museum. According to Skit.com the “African American Museum sets a new standard in Museums as Destination. The large number of visitors in February forced the Museum to offer timed tickets.”
The Alliance of Museums reports that museums “directly contribute $21 billion to the US economy each year and billions more through indirect spending by visitors.” In addition, “There are approximately 850 million visits each year to American museums, more than the attendance of all major league sports events and theme parks combined (483 million in 2011).

Back to the Big Bucks theory. According to the Travel Industry of America “Thirty percent or 35.3 million adults say that a specific arts, cultural or heritage event or activity influenced their choice of destination. In fact, many travelers will extend their stay because of an arts, cultural or heritage event or activity. That mean cultural tourists spend more than the average tourist. This translates to jobs. Hey, I thought you were all about bringing jobs home.

And I know you’re all about business. So is defunding the National Endowment for the Arts a good business decision? 

http://www.elainemarieartist.com

Twelve Dollars Can Save a Lighthouse 

For only $12, you can join efforts to save Florida’s Endangered Lighthouses. join the Florida Keys Reef Lights Foundation at http://www.floridakeysreeflightsfoundation.wildapricot.org/page-1475853

Last year the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation announced the 2016 11 Most Endangered Historic Sites at the 38 th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference in Tallahassee. The Most Endangered Historic Sites program is designed to increase the public’s awareness of the urgent need to save Florida’s neglected or threatened historic resources, and to empower local preservationists and preservation groups in their efforts to preserve Florida’s rich history.

Florida Keys Reef Lighthouses was on the Most Endangered List
 The Florida Keys Reef Lighthouses are an important piece of Florida’s history. The six reef lighthouses are Carysfort Reef (6 miles south of Key Largo), Sand Key (7 miles southwest of Key West), Sombrero Key (5 miles south of Marathon), Alligator Reef (4 miles south of Islamorada), Fowey Rocks (6 miles east of Key Biscayne) and American Shoal (5 miles south of Sugar Loaf). Built between 1852 and 1880, these lighthouses are made of cast iron with a skeletal design to let as much wind and waves pass through in order to withstand hurricanes. These lighthouses were constructed to warn ships of the hazardous reefs below the surface. The Florida Keys Reef Lighthouses are currently owned by the US Coast Guard. The Florida Keys Reef Lights Foundation is applying for ownership of all but Fowey Rocks, which has been transferred to Biscayne National Park. With the Coast Guard facing budget cuts and many boaters relying on GPS for navigation, the proper upkeep of the lighthouses has been lacking. All lighthouses now have corrosion showing, and vandals leave the doors and windows open causing damage on the inside (Fowey Rocks has been secured now). The need to save these lighthouses as pieces of history now doubles to protect the reef. Should the lighthouses be left to decay the structures would fall on the reef causing damage that cannot be repaired.

“Art, like morality consists in drawing the line somewhere” GK Chesterton.

 

http://www.elainemarieartist.com
http://www.elainemarieartist.wordpress.com

TGIF: Doubling as an artist and street cop on Aviles

Travel, St. Augustine, Aviles Street, Florida, travel, vacation, Georgia Nick Gallery, art, painting

Aviles Street in St. Augustine, Florida.

After seven intensive days painting as a Plein Air artist in St. Augustine’s Glided: Impressions of the Flager era, I was ready to put my watercolors and pastels away and cool my brushes.

As I was leaving the Gilded Art Walk reception, a fellow Plein Air artist mentioned a one day event on Aviles. It seems the Art Gallery owners on Aviles Street were inviting artists to paint one day then exhibit the art afterwards.

Since my car was still loaded with art supplies, I decided to participate the next day.

Outside Georgia Nick Gallery

An artist paints in front of Georgia Nick Gallery.

I arrived early the following day for the event. I stopped by Georgia Nick Gallery to receive a badge and gift bag. I found a place on a busy corner to paint.

Corner where I painted

Intersection where I doubled as an artist and traffic cop.

I found a vantage point on a busy corner. Doubling as artist and traffic cop, I painted and hailed traffic for cars driving nearby. It seems the drivers were blind sided and needed help crossing the intersection.

My painting, "Afternoon on Aviles."

My painting, “Afternoon on Aviles.”

After a few hours of painting and hailing traffic, I was pleasantly surprised at results of the painting. I didn’t see much potential in the watercolor wash initially. But as I begin to use complementary pastel colors I could feel the painting coming to life.

http://www.elainemarieartist.com

The Friendliest Gallery in St. Augustine

Travel, St. Augustine, Aviles Street, Florida, travel, vacation, Georgia Nick Gallery, art, painting

Aviles Street in St. Augustine.

Aviles in St. Augustine is a quaint cobblestone, pedestrian friendly street with historic buildings, art galleries and restaurants. Art Walk on First Fridays is a perfect time to emerge in the creative atmosphere, grab a few munchies and pick up a few pieces of art.

Outside Georgia Nick Gallery

Georgia Nick Gallery

I visited a few galleries during Art Walk and ended up at the Georgia Nick Gallery, 11 Aviles Street. A variety of affordable art, cordial staff and generous hors d’oeuvres beckoned me. Inside the gallery, there’s art for any wallet. You’ll find helpful and knowledgeable staff.

Inside the gallery

Art of all shapes and sizes to fit your decor and budget.

The gallery owner, Georgia Nick, is a photographer and available to assist you as you browse. An article in Old City Life, hailed the Georgia Nick Gallery as “The Friendliest Gallery in Town.” You’ll agree!

the shortness of life can not dissuade us from its pleasures

My painting eat, drink and be merry.

My painting, “Eat, Drink and Be Merry,” will be on display at the St. Augustine Art Association through May 28.

“The shortness of life can not dissuade us from its pleasures nor console us for its pains.”

This quote by Luc de Clapiers sums up the life and legacy of Henry Morrison Flagler. The brevity of  life did not spare Flagler sorrows nor limit his dreams. A millionaire developer and co-founder of Standard Oil, Flagler suffered the loss of two daughters, a grandchild and a wife who died of tuberculosis.

Flagler’s life and accomplishments were part of the inspirations for my Trilogy: Flagler Mortality series.

My Flagship painting ” You can’t it take it with you” is of the Memorial Presbyterian Church. Splashes of gold and color droplets allude to wealth and the brevity of life.

Flagler built the Memorial Presbyterian Church in St Augustine to honor his daughter who died in childbirth. Flagler, his first wife and daughter are entombed in the church building.

My colorful and festive painting ” Eat, Drink and Be Merry” captures the essence of Flagler’s Alcazar Hotel. The hotel offered accommodations, dining and expansive recreational facilities. It had a casino, bowling alley, tennis courts, Turkish and Russian baths, Swedish Massage services and one of the world’s largest indoor swimming pools.

My third painting, “Behind Every Rich Man,” is of Grace Methodist Church and Wiley Hall. The muted colors and lack of details depicts the lack of recognition often given to key players.

Located behind the Flagler’s glamorous Ponce de Leon Hotel, both buildings are reminders of those who contributed to Flagler’s success. Flagler’s executives used Wiley Hall to conduct business. Grace Methodist Church relocated and sold Flagler the land on which he built the Alcazar.

http://www.elainemarieartist.wordpress.com