Art Deco Weekend fun for kids of all ages


Grab your sunshades and imagination for Art Deco Weekend, Jan. 12-15. 

Deco Kids Club
Stop by Caricatures for Tots at my Splash and Color booth Saturday and Sunda. Buy a limited edition signed copy of my Miami Beach Art Deco coloring book. 

Lively costumed characters, free art activities, kids marketplace, carnival, free kids Art Deco tours and more await children. 

Jazz Age at Art Deco VIP 
Experience the mystique and glamour of the prohibition era. Pay $55 for live jazz and an evening soirée. Listen to Michael Arenella, his Dreamland Orchestra and other jazzy musicians the entire weekend. 

Entertainment 
Miami Beach’s longest running festival has it all. Don’t miss these exciting events: 

Antique Car Show, Bark Deco Dog Show, Guided Tours, Antique and Design Promenade, Films, Classic Car Show and more. 

Visit over 100 pop up shops on Ocean Drive with tantalizing cuisine and unique items while enjoying free street entertainment. 
For more information visit, http://artdecoweekend.com/events/#event-films

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Ring in the Holidays

Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse

Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse near Palm Beach, Florida.

Ring in the holidays at Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse’s Holiday Shop and Sip Social on Dec. 6 from 5:30-7:30 pm. Enjoy holiday shopping with wine, tasty treats and free gift wrapping. Special discounts benefit the lighthouse. Purchase unique gifts for the kids and that hard to please someone on your Christmas list. Get a free Lighthouse ornament when you become a member of Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse. RSVP at 561-747-8380 x101

St. Augustine Lighthouse in North Florida.

St. Augustine Lighthouse in North Florida.

Join the Luminary Night celebration at St. Augustine Lighthouse, Dec. 6 from 6-10 pm. Get free admission, visit Santa and witness over 1,000 dazzling candles. Catch the Christmas spirit while enjoying holiday music. For more information, call 904-829-0745.
https://www.splashandcolor.com/home/spotlight/

 

 

 

 

TGIF: Keys Residents say they need help not tourists

Although no longer in the headlines, the Florida Keys is still suffering from the impact of Hurricane Irma that hit in September. In a desperate move, the Keys were open to the public on October 1. Tourism is the lifeline of the economy. 

While Key Largo and Key West suffered little damage, most of the Keys were devastated by Hurricane Irma. 

According to FEMA 25% of the homes in the Keys were impacted by Hurricane Irma and 65% of the homes were destroyed. Recovery efforts continue in the the lower Keys and Marathon which were hardest hit by the storm. 

The focus on luring tourists back to the Keys has baffled some residents who still haven’t recovered from the hurricane. They feel essential needs of residents are being overlooked. 

Schools and educational organizations in the Keys have also been devastated and need help. Big Pine Academy is asking for donations for their recovery efforts. Donations will help rebuild the school and replace supplies lost by the teachers. Visit their website to see how you can help. (https://bigpineacademy.com)

I’m determined to do what I can to help. I am donating 40% per cent of the proceeds from my coloring book Splash and Color to the Early Learning Children’s Foundation in Miami.

The Early Learning Children’s Foundation carried supplies to the Keys immediately after the hurricane. They have a track record of helping the residents of the Florida Keys. It’s my boots on the ground approach. Please buy a coloring book to help South Florida recover from Hurricane Irma. 

https://www.splashandcolor.com

The Bass: Talk of the Town

 

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Before renovation, The Bass displays Public Art during Art Basel. 

The Bass solidifies its position as an art leader in Miami by bringing a fresh way of seeing and experiencing art. The grand reopening of The Bass heralds a new age.

After being closed for 2 1/2 years, The Bass opens with much fanfare and anticipation on Sunday. Before its temporary closure, the museum had transformed itself to a hotspot for contemporary art.

Now it artfully and skillfully showcases its old masterpieces alongside contemporary art. Botticelli, Rubens, El Greco and Van Dyke take center near contemporary art and challenges visitors to rethink their perceptions about art.

Instead of discarding the past, The Bass preserves it in a fresh and exciting way. The Art Deco building that houses the Bass is revitalized with new exhibition spaces, expanded lobby and education center, and grand staircase.

Designed by Russell Pancoast in the 1930s, it is one of the oldest buildings in Miami Beach. With the new expansion, the old and new form a fascinating dialogue.

As William Murtugh states “…at its best, preservation engages the past in a conversation with the present with a mutual concern for the future.”

The Bass has done that in a bold and brash way.

South Beach Finally Gets It After Raucous Behavior


Splash and Color: Art Deco Coloring Book for Kids of All Ages. A coloring book to engage families with Art Deco. I thought it was a good idea a few years ago.

When I pitched my idea about reaching the family market in South Beach a few years ago, I was met with disdain. My plea fell on deaf ears when I approached the Miami Design Preservation League, Delano and the hotels on Ocean Drive about my coloring book and a Coloring Contest to reach the family market in South Beach. I wasn’t surprised by the lack of enthusiasm or vision. Artists have a tendency to be ahead of the curve.

After years of bad publicity and overly aggressive police behavior to control “raucous” behavior Mayor Levine and the City of Miami Beach are endeavoring to change the Art Deco District’s image. They want to make Ocean Drive better for residents and families. The recent Air and Sea Show is a good start. I hope the business community supports the initiatives to make Ocean Drive a safer and better place for residents and families.
http://splashandcolor.com

Twelve Dollars Can Save a Lighthouse 

For only $12, you can join efforts to save Florida’s Endangered Lighthouses. join the Florida Keys Reef Lights Foundation at http://www.floridakeysreeflightsfoundation.wildapricot.org/page-1475853

Last year the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation announced the 2016 11 Most Endangered Historic Sites at the 38 th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference in Tallahassee. The Most Endangered Historic Sites program is designed to increase the public’s awareness of the urgent need to save Florida’s neglected or threatened historic resources, and to empower local preservationists and preservation groups in their efforts to preserve Florida’s rich history.

Florida Keys Reef Lighthouses was on the Most Endangered List
 The Florida Keys Reef Lighthouses are an important piece of Florida’s history. The six reef lighthouses are Carysfort Reef (6 miles south of Key Largo), Sand Key (7 miles southwest of Key West), Sombrero Key (5 miles south of Marathon), Alligator Reef (4 miles south of Islamorada), Fowey Rocks (6 miles east of Key Biscayne) and American Shoal (5 miles south of Sugar Loaf). Built between 1852 and 1880, these lighthouses are made of cast iron with a skeletal design to let as much wind and waves pass through in order to withstand hurricanes. These lighthouses were constructed to warn ships of the hazardous reefs below the surface. The Florida Keys Reef Lighthouses are currently owned by the US Coast Guard. The Florida Keys Reef Lights Foundation is applying for ownership of all but Fowey Rocks, which has been transferred to Biscayne National Park. With the Coast Guard facing budget cuts and many boaters relying on GPS for navigation, the proper upkeep of the lighthouses has been lacking. All lighthouses now have corrosion showing, and vandals leave the doors and windows open causing damage on the inside (Fowey Rocks has been secured now). The need to save these lighthouses as pieces of history now doubles to protect the reef. Should the lighthouses be left to decay the structures would fall on the reef causing damage that cannot be repaired.

“Art, like morality consists in drawing the line somewhere” GK Chesterton.

 

http://www.elainemarieartist.com
http://www.elainemarieartist.wordpress.com

TGIF: Doubling as an artist and street cop on Aviles

Travel, St. Augustine, Aviles Street, Florida, travel, vacation, Georgia Nick Gallery, art, painting

Aviles Street in St. Augustine, Florida.

After seven intensive days painting as a Plein Air artist in St. Augustine’s Glided: Impressions of the Flager era, I was ready to put my watercolors and pastels away and cool my brushes.

As I was leaving the Gilded Art Walk reception, a fellow Plein Air artist mentioned a one day event on Aviles. It seems the Art Gallery owners on Aviles Street were inviting artists to paint one day then exhibit the art afterwards.

Since my car was still loaded with art supplies, I decided to participate the next day.

Outside Georgia Nick Gallery

An artist paints in front of Georgia Nick Gallery.

I arrived early the following day for the event. I stopped by Georgia Nick Gallery to receive a badge and gift bag. I found a place on a busy corner to paint.

Corner where I painted

Intersection where I doubled as an artist and traffic cop.

I found a vantage point on a busy corner. Doubling as artist and traffic cop, I painted and hailed traffic for cars driving nearby. It seems the drivers were blind sided and needed help crossing the intersection.

My painting, "Afternoon on Aviles."

My painting, “Afternoon on Aviles.”

After a few hours of painting and hailing traffic, I was pleasantly surprised at results of the painting. I didn’t see much potential in the watercolor wash initially. But as I begin to use complementary pastel colors I could feel the painting coming to life.

http://www.elainemarieartist.com